The CC story

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Sat Jan 19, 2019 9:56 am

Once the gearbox was installed and all the electrical work was done I almost spent a whole weekend double/triple checking the wiring.
The last thing I want is to see smoke.

Connected the battery, no smoke, switched on the ignition, no smoke. So far so good.

I hooked up the VCDS, cleared out all errors.
I switched off the ignition and turned it back on again and used the VCDS to scan for errors again.

My main interest area was in the ECU (Engine), TCU (Gearbox) and the ABS.
I could communicate with the ECU and TCU which was good news.
The ECU had a couple of errors due to some sensors that wasn't connected, which was normal since those sensors weren't connected at that time.
No errors to indicate that there was a problem.

Now since the ECU was from a front wheel drive I need to tell it that needs to be in a 4 wheel drive mode.
In VCDS, in the coding section, there's a place that you can tell it if it's a fwd or 4wd.
But, as expected, the ECU did not allow the 4wd coding. I helped with another conversion for someone a couple years back, MKV GTI manual to DSG 4wd conversion, and I had the same result.
I just need to update the ECU with the 4wd software.

There are errors from the ABS unit complaining about the ECU.
It's got to do that the ABS expects the ECU to be in a 4wd mode, which currently the ECU is in fwd mode.

Checked the TCU and found no errors which was also good news.
Since I was itching to know how many kms the gearbox has done, I went into the measure group that will display how many kms the gearbox has done.
It showed that the gearbox has done just other 25000Km. So still pretty new.
The gearbox was manufactured in May 2013 and the code is NZS.

Now the next step is to start it.
Tried to start it but it's saying that I need to move the gear selector into neutral or park position.
It doesn't matter if the gear lever is in neutral or park it kept saying I need to move the gear selector into neutral or park position.
I checked the gearbox wiring again. Everything seems to be connected in the right place.

I used the VCDS to view the ECU and the TCU measuring blocks that displays the gear lever selector position.
Both control units do display the proper gear lever positions.
But something is not allowing the ECU to start the engine.

I used a multimeter to check the voltages on certain pins on the gearbox.
Found one pin that had a floating voltage. It was floating around the 6-8 volts, so I suspected that there was something wrong with the electronics on the mechatronics unit.
Since this gearbox came out of a Audi Q3 that had a small engine bay fire.
The vehicle may had the ignition on while the fire was there and may have shorted something out in the electronics section of the mechatronics unit in the gearbox.

Since I've an extra DQ500 gearbox I decide to make an extension cable that will reach the other DQ500 gearbox.
Was a bit too lazy to swap the gearbox out and I really want to rule out certain things.
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Disconnected the plug from the gearbox, shoved the wires into the plug and plugged the makeshift extension the other DQ500 gearbox.
With the VCDS I could communicate with the gearbox.

Tried starting and this time the motor fired immediately. It idled smoothly.
That was a great relief and I was overjoyed.
Also the immobiliser delete was done properly on the ECU.
Blipped the throttle a couple of times and the engine responded to it.

Heard no funny noises from the gearbox.
I wanted to put it into Drive and let it go through the gears, but decided against it since I don't have the driveshafts on yet.
I couldn't let the engine run it too long since there was no coolant and no exhaust, so I switched off.

Before disconnecting the makeshift gearbox plug I was really interested what was the mileage on the other DQ500 gearbox since it looks fairly shiny and clean.
Also the gearbox was manufactured in July 2015.
Looked at the measuring group that displays the distance travelled.
It showed that the gearbox only travelled 3840kms. That's basically brand new.
The "new" gearbox that will replace the other one.
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I spent a couple of hours in swapping the gearbox out.
Once done the car starts with no problem.

Now it's onto the next step.
That is to install the whole front nose back on, but I also ran into a problem, which was caused by me.
If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:50 pm

Time to put the front nose back on.

Since the donor CC had the intercooler damaged in the accident, I decided to get this instead of buying a new stock intercooler.
Since I'm going the big turbo route later on I might as well build some foundation for it.
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It was well packaged.
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Busy installing it. Covered the new intercooler with cardboard to protect the the fine fins.
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Since I damaged the radiator for the coolant while I was removing the engine from the donor CC I had to get a new one.
All radiators (aircon, intercooler and coolant radiator) installed.
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The Wagner Tuning intercooler fitting in there snuggly.
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Once I installed the nose on I notice that on the driver's side section of the radiator fan was slightly touching the aircon compressor pipe.
Also I couldn't fit the intercooler inlet pipe from the turbo, it was a bit long.
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See how close the small radiator fan is towards the engine in the red circle.
It needed to move back by about three to four centimeters

This literally got me going for two days.
I checked that I've got the correct aircon compressor pipes, had to replace them since the VR6 and the 2L models had different routing.
I checked that the whole radiator bundle is sitting in the nose cradle properly.
Also checked that the nose cradle is the correct one, well you can only get one, it's the same between the VR6, 4 cylinder petrol and diesels.
Checked that the intercooler was the correct one, which it was.

When I eventually found out what was the problem, after two days, I just kicked myself.
While I was in my garage I saw the spare side engine mount, then it suddenly dawned on me, was I still using the 3.6L mounting?
I checked and I was using the 3.6L mounting instead of the 2L.
See the differences, the 3.6L on the left and the 2L on the right.
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It was that length difference I needed.
Why is it the simple things that can really stuff us around a bit.

Once the 2L side engine was installed everything just lined up.
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Finally the nose is on.
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The next step is to sort out the driveshafts and install them.
If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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Moolz
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Re: The CC story

Postby Moolz » Fri Jan 25, 2019 5:42 pm

Super impressive! Awesome detailed write up too. Keep the updates coming!
ps. how many hours and ZAR have you put into the swap (ex purchase price)?
01' Mk1 - 1.6i (76kw / 140nm - RBTS)
12' Mk6 - GTI

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:39 pm

Moolz wrote:Super impressive! Awesome detailed write up too. Keep the updates coming!
ps. how many hours and ZAR have you put into the swap (ex purchase price)?


Thanks.
I've started this project at end of May 2018 and completed it at the end of November 2018.
Well, the costs came in at 10s of thousands of Rands. I've got all the invoices and I'll have a heart attack if I add everything up.


With the driveshafts from the scrapyard, both of the outer CVs the threads, were the axle bolts onto, had some damages to it.
Both of the inner CVs had their rubber boots ripped off and has dirt (sand) in them.

Was worried that the outer CVs damaged threads might be beyond repair, but was lucky enough that only two to four turns of the threads was damaged.

Was also worried that the inner CVs bearing, each CV has three bearings, had dirt (sand) in it and might not able to clean them out properly.
But I did manage to clean the bearings out properly and regreased them.
The inner CVs doesn't have the 6 bolts, like most other inner CVs, that needs to be bolted onto the gearbox flanges.
The DQ500 has spline shaft that you just push the driveshaft onto.

Here's the three bearing that slides into a housing.
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The housing that has the bearing in it. This housing slides onto a little shaft on the gearbox.
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The center part of the three bearings is connected to the driveshaft.

The housing with the blue cover which is the side that will connect to the gearbox.
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Here's the outer CV with the insides stripped out, cleaned up nicely and ready to be put back together again.
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The outer CV put back together, just need to install onto the driveshaft, put some grease in and install the rubber boot.
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The fully assembled driveshaft with the CVs cleaned out, new OEM grease and OEM rubber boots.
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Both of the right and left hand drive shafts is ready to be installed, but that's later on since I need to do other things first.

According to the DQ500 that came from the Audi Q3, that had the small fire, it had done just over 25 000Kms.
This means the back diff is still newish.
Since the CC had done 150 000Kms I decided to swap the diffs around so the less mileage one will be in the CC.

Before installing the newer diff in the CC I decided to replace the Haldex oil and the Diff oil.
According to VW there's no need to replace the filter on the 4th generation Haldex unit.
Don't listen to that nonsense, replace the filter at every oil change intervals.
There are many stories popping up on the internet on high mileage 4th generation Haldex units that hadn't ever changed the filter had some sludge problems.

I had to use a large screw to "force pull" the stubborn filter out.
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The filter out.
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The oil was a very dark brown in color.
Got me wondering if the 60 000Km haldex oil change was a bit long for this Audi Q3 since it only had done just over 25 000Kms.
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Some particles that came out from the Haldex.
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The diff oil that came out was still pretty clean.
Had that light golden color.

Jacked up the rear to do the diff swap.
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The dirty old diff.
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Cleaned both of the inner driveshaft area.
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Cleaned the diff as much as possible and ready to be taken out.
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Before I can take out the diff there are two bolts that I need to access from inside the CC.
This will be from the boot area.
I need to drill two large holes in the body to access those two bolts, to loosen them for the diff.
You'll see two dimples on the body, just above the spare wheel.
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The two holes drilled.
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The bolt that needs to be loosened for the diff to come out.
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Once out I decided that the underside of the CC needs a major clean up.
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After spending a considerable time in cleaning this is the results.
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The two diffs.
The left one is the lower mileage one and the right one is from the CC.
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The left one was installed in the CC.

Once the diff was installed, I need to close off the two holes that I drilled through the body.
VW has the plugs for it which I bought and installed them.
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The undercarriage covers has seen better days so I decided to strip them out.
You can see how dirty it is under there.
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So I went on a cleaning spree.
I stripped out all under linings covers, including all the wheel arches.
It wasn't easy cleaning everything, laying on the creeper, scrubbing, water running down your arms, etc...
Also it taken some considerable time as well, but the results was really satisfying.

Just need the last rinse, but looks far better than before.
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The propshaft, the heat shields installed and the new undercarriage covers installed.
From underneath it looks like a new car.
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If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Sat Feb 02, 2019 3:56 pm

Moolz wrote:Super impressive! Awesome detailed write up too. Keep the updates coming!
ps. how many hours and ZAR have you put into the swap (ex purchase price)?


Slowboat wrote:I've started this project at end of May 2018 and completed it at the end of November 2018.

Sorry I completed the CC project towards the end of September 2018 not November 2018 as indicated.
If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Sun Feb 03, 2019 3:06 pm

The next step is to install the downpipe.
The back part of the exhaust system will stay stock.
The diameter of the back stock exhaust is slightly bigger than the 2L turbo stock exhaust, so I'm happy about that.

Now the problem is that the front wheel drive exhaust, that came from the donor CC car will not fit.
The propshaft is in the way.

At that time I suspected that there would be no off the shelf aftermarket downpipe, the likes of MK6 R exhaust and so on.
I had a sneaky suspicion that the engine sits slightly more forward than the golfs.
With that in mind I decided to buy an aftermarket downpipe for the Golf MK6 R.

The new Golf MK6 R downpipe.
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I did try fit it and it did not. As I suspected the engine sits further to the front than the Golfs.
Time to whip my Tig Welder out and make it fit.

The little section that I need to add on, just after the turbo outlet.
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Just making sure that the added pipe section is correct before welding the other pipe on that goes towards the stock exhaust, underneath the car.
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The pipe that needs to go into the back stock exhaust.
Need to make a S joint here.
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The S joint made.
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I decided to install a V-Band connection, so it is easier to remove/install the downpipe.
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The straight section is literally millimeters away from the prop shaft bracket.
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The end result of what used to be a downpipe for the Golf MK6 R.
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Installed it and sounds okay, a bit quiet but okay.
I'll build one in the future sometime to replace the stock back piece.
If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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Slowboat
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Re: The CC story

Postby Slowboat » Sun Feb 03, 2019 3:41 pm

Now I need to deal with the suspension.

When I first got the car I was surprised how well the CC handles around the corners.
It does have some body roll which I didn't like at all and also almost bigger than your fist wheel gaps.

I wanted to get the Eibach ProKit springs but the person I was dealing with didn't seem to be too interested.
It's the "did you receive my email, no please resend" stories.

I then tried another supplier that I have dealt years back, but unfortunately they don't do the Eibach products.
So I settled on the H&R springs, front/back sway bars and the Koni sport shocks.

The reason why I want the Eibach springs because they seems to be the only ones the will have the same front/back height on the CC.
The other springs will have that rake look.
Anyway there are ways the sort that out.

The H&R front/back sway bars.
My cat Sniffels approves.
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The H&R front/back springs
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The Koni front/back sport shocks (both adjustable)
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The front left wheel arch area.
Cleaned it nicely and ready to receive the suspension components.
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The Koni shock and H&R spring installed.
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Also installed the ECS end links.
Notice the new plastic liner.
I've replace all front wheel arch liners, skid pan and covers.
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Cleaned the back wheel arch as well.
The back left side with Koni shock, H&R springs and ECS end links installed.
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The end result.
Notice the rake look. The front is lower than the back.
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The front height.
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The back height.
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If you're behind, you're slow. If you're in front, you're in my way.

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MKV GTI build specs: My MKV GTI Big Turbo build specs

Bamjee
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Re: The CC story

Postby Bamjee » Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:54 pm

Really good read

Spud
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Re: The CC story

Postby Spud » Fri Feb 08, 2019 9:32 am

Amazing work as always

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Green
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Re: The CC story

Postby Green » Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:27 am

This is insane!

You definitely seem to have waaaay more patience than most.

Where do you find the time?
:drama:


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